thehumanarkle:

bookoisseur:

Yup. Pretty much.

I have never seen a political cartoon so beautifully and succinctly describe the modern Republican, and I’ve seen some good ones mind you.

thehumanarkle:

bookoisseur:

Yup. Pretty much.

I have never seen a political cartoon so beautifully and succinctly describe the modern Republican, and I’ve seen some good ones mind you.

(Source: cartoonpolitics, via drublood)

brucesterling:

http://99daysoffreedom.com

brucesterling:

http://99daysoffreedom.com

Too often I pay attention to the wrong thing

protoslacker:

In my feed today there was a clip from a piece from May this year at BBC Africa: Kenya’s hidden sex tourism in Malindi. I used Google to find the article because having seen reporting on this issue previously, I wondered if something had happen, a new development.

The piece is by BBC producer Charlotte Atwood and was billed as an investigative piece. And heavens knows I’m not a qualified press critic, just someone who reads the news. The article disturbed me from a journalistic stand point. 

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There is an historic pride in the fundamental goodness of the Dhamma which causes conflict and hostility. There are enough teachings in the Buddhist Canon that warns against such an attitude, but there are also many examples in Buddhist history where a strong sense of pride in one’s own tradition is supported. It is precisely where an attitude in which the most compassionate, the most Buddhist, the most traditional are valued – that intolerance in Buddhist culture comes into focus.
Paul Fuller at New MandalaCauses of intolerance and prejudice in Buddhism (via protoslacker)
Dependence on apocalyptic thinking is one of the most destructive forms of present shock, and it’s the result of an intolerance for situations with no clear outcome, no winner or loser, no final “result”. It makes people and institutions almost constitutionally incapable of contending with chronic problems, adopting sustainable approaches, or even seeing sustenance as a victory in itself.
Douglas Rushkoff at P2P Foundation from: TECHNOLOGIST 01 JUN 23, 2014. Douglas Rushkoff on why we need a ‘Slow Science’. (via protoslacker)
Now, if corporations are entitled to 1st amendment rights because they are people, it follows that they must also be entitled to 13th amendment rights. That is, corporations have a right not to be owned by other people. Thus, corporations must be set free from their owners and all such ownership must be declared null and void.
Mike LaBossier at Talking Philosophy. Liberate the Corporations? (via protoslacker)
Databending using Audacity Effects | Question Something

Databending using Audacity Effects | Question Something

Blanket surveillance [of the kind the NSA has routinely engaged in] is highly unlikely to prevent a terrorist attack and is a dangerous misuse of resources that, if used in other ways, possibly could prevent attacks (such as the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing). Anyone with a reasonable sense of large numbers could surmise a similar conclusion. When the goal is to identify a very small number of key signals in a large ocean of noise, indiscriminately increasing the size of the ocean is self-evidently not the way to go. I reach my conclusion having spent five years looking at this problem in depth. From early 2002 until the middle of 2006, I worked on a Defense Department research project called NIMD (Novel Intelligence from Massive Data).
The NSA: A Betrayal of Trust, Keith Devlin (PDF)
Twenty-sided die (icosahedron) with faces inscribed with Greek letters | Ptolemaic Period–Roman Period | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Twenty-sided die (icosahedron) with faces inscribed with Greek letters | Ptolemaic Period–Roman Period | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

As the thrill of burning a dollar wanes you’ll move on to a five, maybe even try a twenty. Extracting a crisp new $100 bill will cause someone to say, “No!” but your own heart will beat a little faster. This is no longer a symbolic gesture. Will you burn a hundred? I hope so.
Bang for Your Buck - The Morning News
A system that greets a bag of frozen vegetables with a bar code like an old friend but draws a blank on a basket of fresh greens at the farmers market—that’s not just technical. That’s political.
The Fire Phone at the farmers market
When you go out into the woods and you look at trees, you see all these different trees. And some of them are bent, and some of them are straight, and some of them are evergreens, and some of them are whatever. And you look at the tree and you allow it. You appreciate it. You see why it is the way it is. You sort of understand that it didn’t get enough light, and so it turned that way. And you don’t get all emotional about it. You just allow it. You appreciate the tree. The minute you get near humans, you lose all that. And you are constantly saying ‘You’re too this, or I’m too this.’ That judging mind comes in. And so I practice turning people into trees. Which means appreciating them just the way they are. - Ram Dass
http://paperbits.net/post/86940724604
A post-racist society is a society where you really don’t have any white people. That’s the scary thing. . . . The idea of whiteness is tied to power. And the destruction of that power means the end of whiteness itself.
With Atlantic article on reparations, Ta-Nehisi Coates sees payoff for years of struggle - The Washington Post

danielrehn:

A truly different and wild time: the Interface of Kai Krause’s Software.

It is rare to find children rolling down hills, climbing trees, and spinning in circles just for fun. Merry-go-rounds and teeter-totters are a thing of the past. Recess times have shortened due to increasing educational demands, and children rarely play outdoors due to parental fears, liability issues, and the hectic schedules of modern-day society. Lets face it: Children are not nearly moving enough, and it is really starting to become a problem.
Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today - The Washington Post